Andrew- Track bike mechanic, I live with my girlfriend Brenda, who I adore. I am also an avid photographer/woodworker/wood turner and competitive shooter.
+

bbyvoorheez:

hhnmonster:

https://twitter.com/MickeyXtreme

I AM SO EXCITE

topmiata:

Polo Shmolo Photography / “Monster Miata” | www.TopMiata.com | #TopMiata #mazda #miata #mx5 #eunos #roadster

topmiata:

Polo Shmolo Photography / “Monster Miata” | www.TopMiata.com | #TopMiata #mazda #miata #mx5 #eunos #roadster

(Source: fffixe)

jeanfivintage:

Mess call at the planting camp on Lookout Mountain
via OSU Special Collections & Archives : Commons on Flickr

jeanfivintage:

Mess call at the planting camp on Lookout Mountain

via OSU Special Collections & Archives : Commons on Flickr

leonkarssen:

commissioned drawing :)

leonkarssen:

commissioned drawing :)

(Source: defjux)

fullthrottleauto:

Wicked Big Meet 2013 (by GClark64)

fullthrottleauto:

Wicked Big Meet 2013 (by GClark64)

+

Adam the woo Central Florida meet up!

starstuffblog:

Back Shell Tile Panels Installed on NASA’s Orion Spacecraft
Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits have installed a back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew module and are checking the fit next to the middle back shell tile panel. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth’s surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. > Engineers and Technicians Install Protective Shell on NASA’s Orion Spacecraft Image Credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis

starstuffblog:

Back Shell Tile Panels Installed on NASA’s Orion Spacecraft

Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits have installed a back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew module and are checking the fit next to the middle back shell tile panel. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth’s surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. > Engineers and Technicians Install Protective Shell on NASA’s Orion Spacecraft Image Credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis

starstuffblog:

Meteor Crater, Arizona

Meteor Crater, located near Winslow, Arizona, as photographed from the International Space Station. Also known as the Barringer Meteorite Crater, the 1186 m-diameter crater is approximately 180 metres deep and is surrounded by a rim of smashed and jumbled boulders, some as big as houses. The structure visible on the north side of the Crater is the Visitor’s Centre. ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst shared this image on Twitter. 

Alexander Gerst is currently a member of the resident International Space Station Expedition 40 crew. He is spending five and a half months living and working on the ISS for his Blue Dot mission.

starstuffblog:

Meteor Crater, Arizona

Meteor Crater, located near Winslow, Arizona, as photographed from the International Space Station. Also known as the Barringer Meteorite Crater, the 1186 m-diameter crater is approximately 180 metres deep and is surrounded by a rim of smashed and jumbled boulders, some as big as houses. The structure visible on the north side of the Crater is the Visitor’s Centre. ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst shared this image on Twitter.

Alexander Gerst is currently a member of the resident International Space Station Expedition 40 crew. He is spending five and a half months living and working on the ISS for his Blue Dot mission.

(Source: pavpich)

!

!

NEXT »
THEME ©